Grandville Force Majeure original art now on sale

Page 54 of Grandville Force Majeure by Bryan Talbot

Grandville Force Majeure original artwork is now available to buy.



Buy the Heart of Empire Directors Cut

This labour of love from Bryan and myself contains every single page of Heart of Empire in pencil, ink and final full colour format - as well as over 60,000 words of annotation, commentary and explanation from Bryan... - as well as the whole of the Adventures of Luther Arkwright!

Or see the Heart of Empire Directors Cut page for more details.


Join the Facebook group for Bryan Talbot fans for lots of discussions and special offers announced on Facebook first.

 

The Bryan Talbot fanpage is also on Twitter - so give us a follow and join in the conversation!



Also see the Bryan Talbot t-shirt shop! - we've got a vast array of Bryan's images on lots of different t-shirts, as well as other items like mugs and fine art prints: - but if there's anything else you'd like just let us know on Twitter or at the Facebook group.


This is the only place you can buy original Bryan Talbot artwork - except from Bryan in person at a convention.


This is the new version of the Bryan Talbot fanpage
But the whole of the original Bryan Talbot fanpage is still online


Introduction to the Dutch Edition of The Spiral Cage


Dear reader. You are in for a unique experience.

I first met Al Davison and read through The Spiral Cage about twenty-five years ago. It was unique then and it still is today. The version Al showed me was a work-in-progress, a folder of relentlessly experimental and uncompromisingly personal sequential art that was at once poignant, shocking, funny and uplifting. I was amazed. It was a truly groundbreaking piece of comic storytelling that went on to become the first British autobiographical “graphic novel”. It amuses me that there is now the marketing term “non-fiction graphic novel” to describe autobiography and reportage, genres that are patently not novels at all. When Al created The Spiral Cage the comic autobiography genre as such didn’t exist.

When the first edition was published by Renegade Press in 1988 I could read it properly for the first time and it was everything I’d remembered and more. This is what comic albums should be like. They should be as adult, as rich, involving and rewarding as prose books. This seems pretty obvious to readers in the present day but before the graphic novel revolution, in an Anglo-American milieu dominated by bland superhero fare aimed mainly at adolescents, it was an extremely recent concept.

Clearly The Spiral Cage is not unique just because it is autobiography. Though one of the first, proceeded by Justin Green’s Binky Brown Meets the Holy Virgin Mary, Harvey Pekar’s work and, to some extent Art Spiegelman’s Maus, it has been followed in recent years by a torrent of life stories in comic form, from harrowing trauma to lightweight tales of first love.

No, The Spiral Cage is unique because, quite simply, so is Al Davison. His story you are about to begin so I won’t act as a spoiler. What is not mentioned in here though is that Al holds black belts in both Kung-Fu & Karate and has won several martial arts tournaments. He is a theatrical choreographer, set designer and film maker. He teaches drawing skills and storytelling techniques. He performs a Spiral Cage one-man show. He’s worked in the comic industry for over twenty years, creating his own graphic novels and writing and drawing for DC Vertigo and others and is currently drawing the new Doctor Who comic – in a way coming full circle from a scene in this book where he watches the show as a child.

He’s also working on Scar Tissue, a sequel to The Spiral Cage, continuing his story and delving deeper into his past. But, for now, prepare to enter a singular world of brutal honesty, laugh-out-loud humour, astounding images and single-minded determination as Al Davison battles to forge his own destiny against frightening odds.

Bryan Talbot
Sunderland May 2009